Best Asian Noodles For Diabetics – Are These Healthy?

Asian noodles are a broad category of noodles that originated in Asia. They are often made from different grains and may be stir-fried, steamed, or boiled after cooking. Noodles can also be eaten raw, as in cold noodle dishes like sashimi (sliced raw seafood) or salad.

What Are The 5 Healthy Asian Noodles For Diabetics?

There are many types of Asian noodles, including wheat flour noodles, rice noodles, and mung bean thread noodles. Wheat flour noodles are made with wheat flour and water.

Best Asian Noodles For Diabetics - Are These Healthy

They include eggless pasta, which is made without eggs but has the same taste and texture as egg pasta. Rice noodles are made from rice flour and water.

They come in many different shapes, including flat strips and round strands similar to spaghetti. Mung bean thread is made from mung beans mixed with water until it forms a long rope-like strand that is dried before being used in cooking.

Noodle dishes have been around since ancient times in China and Japan: historians believe that they first appeared during the Han Dynasty (206 BC–220 AD) when they were known as jiaozi (potstickers).

Top Asian Noodles For Diabetics

Here are the top 5 healthiest and easiest to prepare Asian noodles.

1) Udon Noodles

Top Asian noodles for diabetics-udon noodle

Udon is a thick wheat noodle that originated in Japan. It is commonly used as a soup but can also be served as a stir-fry or fried dish. Udon is usually made from whole wheat flour, water, and salt but sometimes other ingredients like kombu seaweed powder, bonito flakes (katsuobushi) or kombu seaweed extract may be added for extra flavor.

Udon is a good source of protein and fiber which helps keep you full longer than other types of noodles so it’s great for maintaining low blood sugar levels throughout the day. It also contains several minerals such as iron and magnesium which helps prevent heart disease and high blood pressure among diabetics!

2) Shirataki Noodles

Top Asian noodles for diabetics-shirataki noodles

Shirataki noodles are made from the konjac yam and have zero calories, carbs, fat, or cholesterol. They are very versatile and can be used in soups, stir-fries, or eaten cold with soy sauce or wasabi. Shirataki noodles also come with tofu skin which has a similar texture to regular pasta so it makes for a great substitute for those who miss pasta but want to cut down on carbs.

Shirataki noodles are made from the konjac yam and have zero calories, carbs, fat, or cholesterol. They are very versatile and can be used in soups, stir-fries, or eaten cold with soy sauce or wasabi. Shirataki noodles also come with tofu skin which has a similar texture to regular pasta so it makes for a great substitute for those who miss pasta but want to cut down on carbs.

3) Soba

Top Asian noodles for diabetics-soba

Soba is Japanese buckwheat noodles made from glutenous buckwheat flour. They are popular in the Kantō region of Japan where they originated as well as in the Tohoku region and Okinawa Prefecture. Soba is made by mixing buckwheat flour with water to form a dough which is then rolled out into sheets. The sheets are then cut into strips, boiled in water until soft enough to eat, rinse with cold water, and then finally served with a dipping sauce or eaten plain.

4) Ramen Noodles

Top Asian noodles for diabetics -Ramen Noodles

Ramen noodles make a great base for any meal, especially when you’re on a budget. They’re inexpensive and versatile, making them ideal for anyone with diabetes or other health issues.

Ramen noodles are made from wheat flour, salt, water, and kansui (special alkaline mineral water). Kansui gives ramen noodles their distinctive yellow color and helps preserve the noodles’ texture over time. When cooked properly, they have little fat content and contain just 19 grams of carbohydrates per serving (1 cup cooked).

5) Cellophane Noodles

Top Asian noodles for diabetics -cellophane noodles

Cellophane noodles are made from mung bean starch or sweet potato starch, which is why they have a translucent appearance. Cellophane noodles are known to be lower in calories than other types of noodles, but they also contain less fiber than other options. This means that they will provide you with fewer nutrients than other types of noodles on this list. However, cellophane noodles make an excellent addition to soups and stews because they absorb flavors well without changing their texture much at all (unlike wheat pasta does). You can find cellophane noodles in the Asian section of your local grocery store or online at Amazon or Jet!

Final Words

In the end, the healthiest choice is the one that’s right for you. No single food is going to cure diabetes, but it’s important to try and incorporate new foods into your diet in order to remain healthy. Hopefully, we’ve helped you discover some new options and given you the confidence to try them out.

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